Hair-Pulling, Skin-Picking and Other BFRBs

  – Carolyn Moriarty, LCPC     Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors (BFRBs) describe a group of repetitive and compulsive actions directed towards one’s own body. These behaviors can result in physical damage to the body over time. Common examples of BFRBs include hair pulling (trichotillomania), skin picking (dermatillomania/excoriation disorder), and nail biting. Individuals with BFRBs often engage in these behaviors to cope … Read More

What is a Highly Sensitive Person?

    – Carolyn Moriarty, LCPC   You’ve probably heard the of “introverts” and “empaths” before. Introvert describes a person who becomes drained quickly in social situations and needs plenty of time alone to recharge their energy. Empaths are individuals who have a naturally heightened awareness of the emotions of those around them and often absorb and internalize those emotions. There … Read More

What is Pure OCD?

  – Carolyn Moriarty, LCPC   Pure Obsessional OCD (often called “Pure OCD” or “Pure O”) is among the many subtypes of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Before looking more closely at this particular subtype, let’s do a quick review of OCD. OCD is characterized by the presence of disturbing thoughts or images (obsessions) that are intrusive and unwanted. As a result, people with OCD … Read More

Do’s and Don’ts of Helping Someone With Anxiety

  – Carolyn Moriarty, LCPC   Everyone experiences anxiety from time to time. However, people with anxiety disorders experience excessive and persistent worry about any number of things. Often times, it interferes with their ability to function at work, school and socially. In order to best help someone with an anxiety disorder, is important to understand their experience. Use the steps below as … Read More

Are You Thinking Too Much?

  – Carolyn Moriarty, LCPC   Overthinking, otherwise known as rumination, describes the act of actively thinking about a situation in an attempt to understand it from every side. People often ruminate because it provides some them with some feeling of “control” over a situation in which they have none. In reality, rumination has quite the opposite effect. Dwelling on concerns or memories … Read More

What is Autumn Anxiety

  by Carolyn Moriarty, LCPC   Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is characterized by feelings of depression that start and end at the same time every year, in accordance with a change in seasons. Typically, it is associated with lack of sunlight during the winter months. However, the disorder can affect individuals during any of the four seasons. For instance, depression that is experienced … Read More

What is Psychosis/Mental Health OCD?

 – by Madison Di Silvio     Psychosis/Mental Health OCD is a subtype of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, that consists of intrusive thoughts and ritualistic behavior in attempt to reduce the level of distress these thoughts cause. Psychosis/Mental health OCD is when the sufferer fears they are developing psychosis or another mental health condition that they deem as “worse”. Both could be … Read More

I Can’t Get No Satisfaction: Why Reassurance-Seeking is Making Your Anxiety Worse

  – Carolyn Moriarty, LCPC     Reassurance seeking is a behavior or mental act aimed at clarifying or verifying something that is typically already known. It often emerges through an individual’s inability to tolerate uncertainty. Most people can obtain information and feel relatively satisfied with being “sure enough” of a specific quandary.  However, this “sure enough” part of the brain … Read More

Are You Ruminating or Emotionally Processing?

    – Carolyn Moriarty, LCPC   Brian often finds himself thinking about a time when he was fired from his job as a manager at a reputable software company. He was a good manager and put in a lot of work in order to help the business succeed. However, Brian often butted heads with the other managers and would disregard … Read More

Navigating the Storms of Life

  – Carolyn Moriarty, LCPC   The one thing in life we can count on to remain constant is fact that things are always changing. Change is like the undercurrent of an ocean. It’s always there, surrounding us. It affects us whether we like it or not. One minute, the waves of change are imperceptible and we float along feeling peaceful … Read More