Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD)

BODY DYSMORPHIC DISORDER (BDD)

People with BDD suffer from the obsession that a part of their body is defective, deformed, or flawed. All parts of the body are susceptible, but common sites include hair, skin, nose, and legs. Clients with BDD engage in a number of safety behaviors to relieve their distress including body camouflaging with make-up or extra clothes, excessive mirror checks, reassurance seeking from loved ones, research on how to correct the perceived defect, avoidance of social/public gatherings and, in extreme cases, surgery. Clients suffering from BDD can experience significant life interference on every level (e.g., financial, emotional, social, and occupational). Although BDD affects a percentage of the population similar to other anxiety disorders, it’s not a widely recognized condition. BDD should not be confused with body image dissatisfaction that many people and individuals with Eating Disorders struggle with; in general, individuals with BDD are overly focused on a specific body part vs. their weight.

Before seeing Taylor, I was struggling with OCD behavior, compulsive exercise, and learning how to cope with my past in a healthy way. He was very patient, understanding, and non-judgmental, which allowed me to uncover problems that were essentially being pushed aside. I used to get uncomfortable and self-conscious about discussing certain things that happened when I was younger, but the environment that he creates is very welcoming and I felt at ease when memories came to mind. He also asked me…

Anon, Edgebrook, Chicago 2

Before seeing Taylor, I was struggling with OCD behavior, compulsive exercise, and learning how to cope with my past in a healthy way. He was very patient, understanding, and non-judgmental, which allowed me to uncover problems that were essentially being pushed aside. I used to get uncomfortable and self-conscious about discussing certain things that happened when I was younger, but the environment that he creates is very welcoming and I felt at ease when memories came to mind. He also asked me…

Anon, Edgebrook, Chicago

Let’s Talk About Seasonal Affective Disorder

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The Struggle for Self-Compassion

Is self-compassion good or bad? If asked this question, most people would agree that self-compassion is a positive thing. It’s also likely that the majority of those people have spent their lives cultivating a harsh inner self-critic and readily indulge thoughts such as “I made such a stupid mistake, people must think I’m an idiot” or “I’m not … Continue reading The Struggle for Self-Compassion

Reflecting on Suicide Prevention Month

  Suicide. The word itself elicits a nearly visceral reaction. The topic is often one to be avoided and never appropriate for polite dinner conversation. Yet, September is National Suicide Prevention Month, and as such, we would be remiss not to have an open dialogue about a very real, very dire phenomena in the United … Continue reading Reflecting on Suicide Prevention Month