Tag Archives: anxiety

Anxiety-free traveling- How to take a vacation and actually relax!

travel anxiety After the holidays end, the travel bug kicks in. Not only does the bug start to appear more and more, but Spring Break comes up quickly as well. For some traveling is exciting, but it can also be a pain. Do you want to learn how to ease into vacation better? Are you looking to actually relax and enjoy the trips you take? Whether you are alone or with your family it is possible to eliminate travel anxiety as your constant and primary companion.

 

Here’s how:

  • First and foremost, resist the urge to procrastinate. If you know that the budget is tight, and you need to be scoping out travel costs and hotel prices, make this a fun part of the planning process. It can be fun by making the time for it and not pushing it off until the last minute. So, try setting aside time in your schedule for planning around lodging and how you are going to get to your destination in a way that doesn’t break the bank. The more you put it off, the more it will feel like a burden as opposed to an exciting part of the trip.
  • Try to keep in mind the times that you have successfully approached barriers and difficult situations during previous trips. You may not realize this, but you are already your own traveling expert! That’s right…you are your own expert! This is a good reminder for many different situations that can come up in daily life, and if you take the time to do this you will have a tool you can use forever. “How do I do start?” you might ask. Start by acknowledging that you are the primary expert on all things you! Therefore, take some time to reflect on difficult moments when you have had to approach anxiety-ridden situations and how you successfully got through those times. This exercise will help you come up with tools you can use if similar situations arise while you are away from home.

Continue reading Anxiety-free traveling- How to take a vacation and actually relax!

Think You’re Afraid to Fly? You May Not Be.

Taylor Newondorp MA, LCPC

flying fear  Fear of flying is one of the most common phobias in the United States. You may have a flying fear yourself, or, if not, you definitely know someone who does. A vast majority of the population reports experiencing at least some level of discomfort while flying. For many people it is such a crippling fear that they simply refuse to get on a plane anymore. People frequently use alcohol and/or prescription (or even non-prescription!) medication to help themselves get through a flight with less anxiety, and most people feel a sense of relief once they have landed safely at their destination. But what if I told you that it’s not actually the flying part that freaks you out?

Continue reading Think You’re Afraid to Fly? You May Not Be.

4 Tips to Help You Transition Home This Summer

By: Abigail Yeomans LPC

You may remember how you felt when you left or school in the Fall. There may have been a bit of uncertainty, excitement and anxiety and that makes total sense! Transitioning to college is a big adjustment and one that is only fully realized when you find yourself putting all your belongings into a tiny dorm room with a complete stranger!

After some time, maybe that uncertainty started to dwindle, and the development of a life independent from parents began to settle in. Fast forward nine months and you are headed back home, to all that was so familiar. It may bring up some of the same feelings you had when you left last Fall, but this transition can be even harder. There is a delicate balance between demonstrating respect at home and maintaining freedom, the freedom of identifying as an adult. Therefore, I have come up with a few helpful tips to help out during this time of transition.

1. Communication

A key component of that balancing act is respectful and consistent communication. Communication is essential. The “rule makers” of the house need to communicate with you and vice-versa. Even though at first it may feel frustrating to have to talk more often and check in, but putting the time in sooner rather than later will help you and the entire family adjust more quickly to each other’s expectations for the summer.  In conclusion, it can be difficult for others to know how we feel unless we remain open and honest. So it is an excellent opportunity to assert your needs and wants as you move toward more independence.

2. Routine

It is natural to feel uncertain about how to spend the extra time you have over the summer. Some students describe feelings of anxiety and say things like “I should be doing more” while others describe emotions related to boredom and depression. One way to counteract the worry and rumination associated with anxiety and depression during times of transition is to establish a routine. Routine development and maintenance may help you gain a sense of control and is something that has been proven to assist individuals diagnosed with depression in their recovery. Therefore, why not give it a shot? I would recommend Google Calendar or getting a new planner that you update weekly.

3. Self-Care

Developing a routine is part of taking care of yourself, but self-care is defined a littler more broadly. According to Psychology Today, “Self-care means choosing behaviors that balance the effects of emotional and physical stressors: exercising, eating healthy foods, getting enough sleep, practicing yoga or meditation or relaxation techniques, abstaining from substance abuse, pursuing creative outlets, engaging in psychotherapy.”

One way to start practicing self-care right now is to ask yourself how well you have been keeping up with hygiene and keeping your space clean and organized. If you want to be doing laundry once a week and notice it is evening out to doing laundry more like every two to three weeks, I have a suggestion for you. Reward yourself for completing your goal of doing laundry every week. Rewards can be anything that motivates you, and they don’t have to cost any money.

4. Balanced social life

You and your old friends are now back in the same place! There is nothing better than being reunited with people you care about, and it is equally as exciting to hear from new friends made at school this past year! However, some people report feeling overwhelmed with social responsibilities and anxiety about whether they are doing enough to maintain new and old connections. Balancing time is critical so that the transition home doesn’t quickly feel like a typhoon of social responsibility. Find some time for yourself and time for your family throughout the week for consistency and let your friends know the days and times that work best for you to prevent potential distress.

If you or someone you know starts to feel like the level of pain and emotion experienced during this transition is too much to handle alone, please reach out for support. As I noted in the communication section of this article, time put in now can reduce the long-term impact of mental health concerns you are noticing and that are disruptive to your daily functioning. There is no shame in getting some additional help, and it is never too late or too early to put yourself first!

How do I get rid of my anxiety?

Anxiety treatment chicago counseling centerAs a therapist specializing in Anxiety treatment and the treatment of  Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), the most common question I hear is, “How do I get rid of my anxiety?” My honest answer is, “You can’t.” However through anxiety treatment and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy you can learn skills to manage symptoms of both disorders, and we can teach you how!

I don’t say this to be discouraging or pessimistic, but I have to be realistic. Anxiety is a natural and necessary emotion that all humans–and, in fact, most living animals–experience. Anxiety is the response that warns us of immediate danger and cues our reflexes to move us out of harm’s way. Without anxiety, we would not know instinctually to jump out of the way of a moving car or to duck if someone throws something at our heads. However, with an Anxiety Disorder, those cues get thrown off and people tend to interpret harmless situations–and even their own thoughts, feelings, and physical sensations–as immediate threats. So while you can not ever “get rid of anxiety,” you can learn to discern the difference between danger and discomfort, challenge your anxiety-provoking thoughts, and manage your physical symptoms of anxiety so well that it no longer interferes with your life in any way.

For this post, all I want to do is to extend the invitation to anyone and everyone out there struggling with any type of anxiety to send me your questions. If there is something I don’t have an answer for or a piece of advice on, I will be honest and provide you with additional helpful resources. A key component of overcoming anxiety and OCD is gaining as much education as possible about those subjects, and I am happy to share what I know to help out in that respect.

Even though you don’t know me, you have to believe me when Anxiety treatment chicago counseling centerI say that you are completely capable of mastering your anxiety. I say that because all the counselors at Chicago Counseling Center have personally witnessed hundreds of people do it, using the proven therapeutic methods that we have taught them. If you want to learn more, don’t hesitate to contact us today.

Taylor Newendorp, Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor